Reflections on Canada’s National Action Plan on Women, Peace and Security: Gains, Gaps & Goals

WPSN-C’s new publication, Reflections on Canada’s National Action Plan on Women, Peace and Security: Gains, Gaps & Goals, is now available.

What has been achieved now that Canada’s second National Action Plan on Women, Peace and Security (CNAP) is more than half-way through its implementation period?

There have been notable advancements. Jacqueline O’Neill was appointed as Canada’s first WPS Ambassador in the summer of 2019. And the government of Canada formalized its relationship with civil society through the formation of the WPS Action Plan Advisory Group (co-chaired by WPSN-C) and the allocation of resources to support the WPSN-C’s involvement. Other steps highlighted by the Government include the Elsie Initiative (designed to increase the number of uniformed women in peace operations), co-chairing the WPS Focal Points Network, leading the Global Call-to-Action on Protection from Gender-based Violence in Emergencies, acceding to the Arms Trade Treaty, and supporting the Equality Fund.

We asked Network members for their thoughts and analysis. Where have they seen progress in the past three years? What issues would they like to see in Canada’s WPS efforts going forward?

Eleven chapters in our new publication, Reflections on Canada’s National Action Plan on Women, Peace and Security: Gains, Gaps & Goals, cover issues in the current CNAP that could be strengthened or looked at from new angles, as well as topics that could be incorporated into future CNAPs.


Table of contents

Feminist Theory and a Feminist Framework for Analyzing and Advancing Canada’s National Action Plan on Women, Peace and Security (Kate Lord & Rebecca Tiessen)

Leaders of today: Building Strong Synergies Between Youth, Peace and Security & the Women, Peace and Security Agendas (Katrina Leclerc & Shayne Wong)

Why Canada Needs to be Intersectional: Inclusion of LGBTQ+ Folks in Women, Peace and Security Priorities (Alexandria Kazmerik)

A Responsibility to Lead: A Domestic Lens to Women, Peace and Security Includes Indigenous experiences (Shayne Wong)

Women, Peace and Security Values Start at Home: A Call for a Domestic Agenda (Major (Retired) Karen Breeck & Kristine St-Pierre)

Reflections on the Intersection of Economic Justice and the Women, Peace & Security Agenda: Sudan & Colombia (Rita Morbia & Bill Fairbairn)

Women, Peace and (Private) Security (Maya Eichler & Amanda Chisholm)

Missed Opportunities: Disarmament and Canada’s National Action Plan on Women Peace and Security (Farah Bogani & Erin Hunt)

Bombs Away: Linking Nuclear Disarmament to WPS (Charlotte Akin)

Women First, Soldiers Second: CNAP Commitments to Increasing Women’s Participation in Peace Operations (Sandra Biskupski-Mujanovic)

Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada and the CNAP: How It Is Helping and How it Can Improve Support to Discriminated Refugees (Jo Rodrigues)